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¡Oye! Discover even more Latin music on Google Play Music

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GPM Latin 1

¡Hola! Desplazarse hacia abajo para leer este mensaje en español -Ed.

Google Play Music makes it easy for you to listen to the right music at the right moment. Instead of digging through our catalog of 40 million songs on your own, our concierge of playlists helps you find the perfect, expertly curated soundtrack for any mood, activity or time of day. Enjoy music for watching the sunset, cooking or working out.


Starting this week in the U.S., if you’re an avid listener of Latin music, when you open Google Play Music you’ll see many more Latin playlists alongside your other recommendations. We’ve added 10 times the number of Latin playlists to Google Play Music with more to come. Each station has been handcrafted — song by song — by our team of Latin music experts (a mix of DJs, musicians and music critics). You can now choose one of our new Latin playlists to make whatever you’re doing even better — whether it’s Rock en español para sudar during your morning workout, banda sing-alongs to make your commute whiz by, or an abuela-approved reggaeton mix for your next family gathering.


If you already have playlists and artists you like listening to, Latin music won't replace them. We still want to give you the right music at the right time — whether that's Britney or Romeo Santos. Now, you'll just see even more Latin music playlists to make each of your moments better.

GPM Latin 2

¡Oye! Descubre más música Latina en Google Play Música

Con Google Play Música puedes disfrutar fácilmente de la mejor música en el momento adecuado. En lugar de buscar a través de nuestro catálogo de 40 millones de canciones, nuestras listas musicales personalizadas te permiten escuchar canciones y estaciones de radio basadas en lo que estés haciendo, tu estado de ánimo u hora del dia. Encuentra música para cuando estesviendo el atardecer, cocinando ohaciendo ejercicio.

A partir de esta semana en los EE.UU., si eres un fanático de la música Latina, al usar Google Play Música verás más listas y estaciones de música Latina junto a otras recomendaciones basadas en tus preferencias musicales. Hemos añadido 10 veces el número de listas de música Latina a Google Play Música, y esto es solo el principio!. Cada estación ha sido diseñada a mano - canción por canción - por nuestro equipo de expertos en música Latina (una mezcla de DJs, músicos y críticos musicales). Ahora puedes elegir una de nuestras nuevas listas para hacer lo que estás haciendo aún mejor. Escucha "Rock en español para sudar" cuando estés haciendo ejercicio por la mañana, banda sing-alongs cuando estés manejando, o unreggaeton mix aprobado por la abuela durante tu próxima reunión familiar.

Si ya tienes listas de canciones y artistas que te gustan escuchar, nuestras listas de música Latina no las reemplazan. Queremos brindarte la mejor música en el momento adecuado — ya sea Britney o Romeo Santos. Ahora veras mas listas y estaciones de radio con música Latina para hacer de cada momento uno mejor.

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gcapell
1095 days ago
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US only but possibly interesting for Lucy
Sydney, AU
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Why Don’t Men Kick Each Other in the Balls?

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In Greco-Roman wrestling, boxing, and mixed martial arts, there is a rule that you never hit “below the belt.” The area of biggest concern is the testicles. As the Ultimate Fighting Championship rules specify, “groin attacks of any kind” are a foul. This is probably because groin attacks might make for short fights or ones where everyone just goes around protecting their balls. In any case, the skills being tested are of a different kind. But, even aside from that, this seems like a good idea and very civilized. I do not advocate for testicle kicking, not groin attacks of any kind, for what it’s worth.

I do think it’s somewhat odd, though, that men who fight each other outside of controlled conditions—men in street fights, bar brawls, and parking lot scuffles—also usually avoid hitting below the belt. These fights aren’t about training or skill, like those between professional athletes, they’re real attempts to do some damage out of anger or defensiveness. So, why no hits to the balls?

The question was posed by a woman on Yahoo! Answers: “If you dislike each other enough to want them to get hurt,” she asked, “why not do the worst?”

The answers, admittedly unscientific, were interesting. One of the common responses involved the idea that not hitting below the belt was “an unspoken rule.” Maybe it’s the Golden Rule—do onto others as you would have them do unto you—and some men mentioned that, but others suggested that it was a rule specific to manhood. It’s a “cheap shot,” said one. A “low blow,” said another.

But why? Why do men agree not to kick each other in the balls? Why is that part of the code?

I think it’s because it serves to protect men’s egos as well as men’s balls.

What would street fights between guys look like—or professional fights for that matter—if one could go below the belt? For one, there’d be a lot more collapsing. Two, a lot more writhing in pain. Three, a lot less getting up. All in all, it would add up to less time looking powerful and more time looking pitiful. And it would send a clear message that men’s bodies are vulnerable.

Chris Tuchscherer not having been just hit in the balls:

1a

Chris Tuchscherer having been just hit in the balls:

1

Not hitting below the belt, then, protects the idea that men’s bodies are fighting machines. It protects masculinity, the very idea that men are big and strong, pain- and impact-resistant, impenetrable like an edifice. So not hitting below the belt doesn’t just protect individual men from pain, it protects our ideas about masculinity.

When a man hits below the belt, he is revealing to everyone present that masculinity is a fiction. That’s why one guy said: “For ‘alpha male’ fights, nut shots are just wrong.” Alpha male fights are about figuring out which male is alpha, while preserving the idea that the alpha male is a thing that matters.

This is why men are quick to criticize other men who break the code. One of the best ways to control men is to threaten to kick them out of the man club. “If a guy kicks another guy in the balls on purpose during a fight,” one replied to the question on Yahoo, “he will forever be banished from manhood.” Another said: “Winning like this means that you cannot beat up the other guy by ‘real’ fighting.” It’s a matter of one’s own reputation: “A man who kicks another man in the balls,” said a third, “immediately loses all manliness and respect.”

So, men generally agree to pretend that the balls just aren’t there. The effect is that we tend to forget just how vulnerable men are to the right attack and continue to think of women as naturally more fragile.

I still don’t want anyone to get kicked in the balls, though, just to be clear.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

(View original at http://thesocietypages.org/socimages)

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gcapell
1690 days ago
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She obviously hasn't been to any Krav Maga classes :->
Sydney, AU
d4nj450n
1690 days ago
Bull. Bar room fights are dominance displays. You don't kick the balls because the point is not to permanently hurt the other guy but to show you are tougher then him. You don't gouge the eyes or punch the throat either for the same reason. If you are feel you are in real danger of your life then you go for any and all targets. You see the same thing in wolves, lions, really all the other mammals. They don’t go for the killing or permanently maiming attacks when fighting amongst themselves.
popular
1690 days ago
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4 public comments
dukeofwulf
1689 days ago
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Lisa spends a long time trying to make nut shots into some gendered conspiracy, even though she has the real answer quoted right there in her post: “Winning like this means that you cannot beat up the other guy by ‘real’ fighting.” Exactly as d4nj450n said, nut shots are just one of a whole class of fighting techniques that are shunned in non-self-defense situations.
tante
1690 days ago
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"Why don't men kick each other in the testicles?"
Berlin/Germany
sirshannon
1690 days ago
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wow.
ryanbrazell
1691 days ago
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I love Lisa Wade.
Richmond, VA

Asking the U.S. government to allow Google to publish more national security request data

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This morning we sent the following letter to the offices of the Attorney General and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Read the full text below. -Ed.

Dear Attorney General Holder and Director Mueller

Google has worked tremendously hard over the past fifteen years to earn our users’ trust. For example, we offer encryption across our services; we have hired some of the best security engineers in the world; and we have consistently pushed back on overly broad government requests for our users’ data.

We have always made clear that we comply with valid legal requests. And last week, the Director of National Intelligence acknowledged that service providers have received Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) requests.

Assertions in the press that our compliance with these requests gives the U.S. government unfettered access to our users’ data are simply untrue. However, government nondisclosure obligations regarding the number of FISA national security requests that Google receives, as well as the number of accounts covered by those requests, fuel that speculation.

We therefore ask you to help make it possible for Google to publish in our Transparency Report aggregate numbers of national security requests, including FISA disclosures—in terms of both the number we receive and their scope. Google’s numbers would clearly show that our compliance with these requests falls far short of the claims being made. Google has nothing to hide.

Google appreciates that you authorized the recent disclosure of general numbers for national security letters. There have been no adverse consequences arising from their publication, and in fact more companies are receiving your approval to do so as a result of Google’s initiative. Transparency here will likewise serve the public interest without harming national security.

We will be making this letter public and await your response.

David Drummond
Chief Legal Officer
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gcapell
2320 days ago
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Sydney, AU
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Comic for June 9, 2013

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gcapell
2322 days ago
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bwahaha
Sydney, AU
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What the ...?

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Dear Google users—

You may be aware of press reports alleging that Internet companies have joined a secret U.S. government program called PRISM to give the National Security Agency direct access to our servers. As Google’s CEO and Chief Legal Officer, we wanted you to have the facts.

First, we have not joined any program that would give the U.S. government—or any other government—direct access to our servers. Indeed, the U.S. government does not have direct access or a “back door” to the information stored in our data centers. We had not heard of a program called PRISM until yesterday.

Second, we provide user data to governments only in accordance with the law. Our legal team reviews each and every request, and frequently pushes back when requests are overly broad or don’t follow the correct process. Press reports that suggest that Google is providing open-ended access to our users’ data are false, period. Until this week’s reports, we had never heard of the broad type of order that Verizon received—an order that appears to have required them to hand over millions of users’ call records. We were very surprised to learn that such broad orders exist. Any suggestion that Google is disclosing information about our users’ Internet activity on such a scale is completely false.

Finally, this episode confirms what we have long believed—there needs to be a more transparent approach. Google has worked hard, within the confines of the current laws, to be open about the data requests we receive. We post this information on our Transparency Report whenever possible. We were the first company to do this. And, of course, we understand that the U.S. and other governments need to take action to protect their citizens’ safety—including sometimes by using surveillance. But the level of secrecy around the current legal procedures undermines the freedoms we all cherish.

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gcapell
2324 days ago
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Sydney, AU
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dosman711
2322 days ago
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The real question now is whether we believe them. #privacy
Indianapolis, Indiana

Flowchart

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The way out is to use the marker you have to add a box that says 'get a marker' to the line between you and 'start', then add a 'no' line from the trap box to 'end'.
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gcapell
2388 days ago
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My first shared post.
Sydney, AU
tachfine
2388 days ago
interesting
lepht
2385 days ago
How does one go about subscribing to your newsletter?
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7 public comments
cloudtamer
2386 days ago
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LOL
Reno, NV
Putty
2386 days ago
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Yep...
oliverzip
2387 days ago
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It's a trap!
Sydney, Balmain, Hornsby.
Door
2387 days ago
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My kingdom for an Admiral Ackbar gif.
Vienna, VA, USA
teh_g
2387 days ago
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ITS A TARP
Roseville, CA
adamgurri
2387 days ago
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it's a trap!
New York, NY